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Evaluation of a new silicone gel-adhesive hydrocellular foam dressing as part of a pressure ulcer prevention plan for ICU patients

Evaluation of a new silicone gel-adhesive hydrocellular foam dressing as part of a pressure ulcer prevention plan for ICU patients

Issue Time:2021-06-28

         The use of foam dressings, as part of a comprehensive pressure ulcer prevention plan, has gained increased interest among clinicians in North America. While a relatively new concept in the US and Canada, researchers in Spain published multiple studies on pressure reducing ability of a foam dressing over a decade ago. A statistically significant (p = 0.001) 8-week multi-center study, comparing a padded bandage technique with a foam dressing, demonstrated a 44% incidence in heel pressure ulcers with the padded bandage and 3.3% incidence among those using the foam dressing (1). More recently, Coggins et al (2) and Hager et all (3) identified successful reduction of sacral/coccyx pressure ulcers, using a hydrocellular foam as part of a comprehensive pressure ulcer prevention plan among ICU patients. One company has introduced a new silicone-adhesive hydrocellular foam dressing with improvements for wound management and pressure reduction. 

           In vitro data, comparing the pressure reducing ability of various dressings, identified improved mean pressure reduction with the new foam, compared to that of traditional silicone foam dressings. A pre-market evaluation of the new foam dressing was conducted, as part of a comprehensive plan to reduce sacral/coccyx pressure ulcers in a 24-bed med/surg/neuro ICU. Average Braden Scale score was 12.3. The 22 forms revealed ease of application as excellent (86%) or very good (14%); ease of removal: excellent (72%) or very good (28%); conformability: excellent (45%) or very good (55%); ability to remain adhered without rolling: excellent (82%), very good (12%) or good (6%); and ease of re-application after skin inspection: excellent (83%) or very good (17%). The average dressing wear time was 4 days. Patient’s skin remained intact for all patients, dressing was applied on two patients with prior skin conditions; a Stage I and IAD Lesion, both resolved.

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